Tierra Destiny Reid
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NOTES ALONG
MY JOURNEY

"The beautiful thing about living your truth is that there is no right or wrong. It's your truth. How you express it is where the choice comes in to play."

 

 

Know Your Rights

Know Your Rights

Know your credit rights...how many of us actually read that information that comes along with your credit file. It's important information that can make a difference. Listed below are a few of those important facts.

You must be told if information in your file has been used against you. If you are denied for credit, insurance, or employment – you must be give the name, address, and phone number of the agency that provided the information. 

You have the right to know what is in your file. You may request and obtain all the information about you in the files of a consumer reporting agency. (Identification may be required) 

You have the right to ask for a credit score. (Cost varies depending on credit agency)

You have the right to dispute incomplete or inaccurate information. Consumer reporting agencies must correct or delete inaccurate, incomplete, or unverifiable information. Inaccurate, incomplete or unverifiable information must be removed or corrected, usually within 30 days. However, a consumer reporting agency may continue to report information it has verified as accurate.
Consumer reporting agencies may not report outdated negative information. In most cases, a consumer reporting agency may not report negative information that is more than seven years old, or bankruptcies that are more than 10 years old.

Access to your file is limited. A consumer reporting agency may provide information about you only to people with a valid need -- usually to consider an application with a creditor, insurer, employer, or landlords. You must give your consent for reports to be provided to employers. A consumer reporting agency may not give out information about you to your employer, or a potential employer, without your written consent given to the employer.

You may limit “prescreened” offers of credit and insurance you get based on information in your credit report.

You may seek damages from violators. If a consumer reporting agency, or, in some cases, a user of consumer reports or a furnisher of information to a consumer reporting agency violates the FCRA, you may be able to sue in state or federal court.

Identity theft victims and active duty military personnel have additional rights.

Connect with Santasia:

Website: www.creditdonesimple.com
Twitter Handle: @mscandihill
Instagram Handle: @I_am_candihill
Facebook Handle: Santasia "Candi" Hill
Linked In: Santasia L. Hill